Ryze - Business Networking Get a Coderbuddy developer now
www.coderbuddy.com

"I Highly Recommend Them" - Magnitude.io CEO; US timezone; affordable rates; Silicon Valley leadership
Get your software built!
Buy Ethereum and Bitcoin
Get started with Cryptocurrency investing
Home Invite Friends Networks Friends classifieds
Home

Apply for Membership

About Ryze


Innovation Network
Previous Topic | Next Topic | Topics
The Innovation Network Network is not currently active and cannot accept new posts
More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback FinsViews: 892
Nov 14, 2009 12:23 amMore Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins#

Ron Sam

Whale Power: More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins

WhalePower: Using biomimicry from humpback tubercles to design wind turbines
Tannis Toohey/Toronto Star

Using "a million years of field tests" to their advantage, Toronto-based WhalePower Corp. is using the fins of humpback whales to help design a better fan (and, hopefully, wind turbine). After US scientists discovered that the tubercles -- the little bumps on humpback fins -- result in 32 percent less drag and an 8 percent rise in lift when compared to a smooth fin. That means a fan blade that "makes the fan quieter, more efficient, and better at pushing down the air," according Monica Bowden, chief executive officer of Envira-North, the company that has licensed the WhalePower design.

WhalePower's wind turbine

She estimates fans incorporating WhalePower's design use 20 percent less energy and are better at moving the air around, and now that fans are incorporating the design, WhalePower will continue to work to apply the idea to wind turbines; it's a slower process because of the certification and testing required with the clean power generators. Still, Stephen Dewar, WhalePower's co-founder, is confident it'll come to fruition: "When it comes down to it, we've got the best blades ever made." ::The Star

Now I'm wondering how to use the more efficent blade for a prop in a pedal powered Kayak.
Ron

Private Reply to Ron Sam

Nov 14, 2009 2:23 amre: More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins#

Thomas Holford
> After US scientists discovered that the tubercles -- the little bumps on humpback fins -- result in 32 percent less drag and an 8 percent rise in lift when compared to a smooth fin. That means a fan blade that "makes the fan quieter, more efficient, and better at pushing down the air,"


Interesting.

When I was in the Navy, the aircraft that my squadron operated (C2A's) had horrendously noisy four blade propellers.

The Navy spent a big chunk of money for engineering updates to replace the props with a different design that was quieter (although still pretty noisy).

If these "tubercles" could make an aircraft propeller quieter and more efficient, the Navy and a lot of commercial airlines would be interested.

T. Holford

Private Reply to Thomas Holford

Nov 14, 2009 7:57 pmre: re: More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins#

Ken Hilving
It would be interesting to know how this compares with the props on nuclear submarines. Silent operation has always been a big feature in the game of submarine hide and seek.

The idea of a pedal powered kayak is intriguing. I would think even a recumbent pedal position counter to the low draft profile of a kayak.

Private Reply to Ken Hilving

Nov 14, 2009 10:46 pmre: re: re: More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins#

Ron Sam
Ken,

Hobie makes a kayak that you pedal to propel and it is fast! I have a hard time keeping up with those kayakers in Hobies.

Hobie invented a two blade propelling device that is on their site
http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaking/miragedrive.html

I have seen something else that uses a regular prop like the stem on an outboard motor.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMw8q5g4DsE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R83c_gKTGY4

Private Reply to Ron Sam

Nov 14, 2009 11:05 pmre: re: More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins#

Raymond Tautuhi
Well that makes sense when someone finally demonstrates it.

We have seen Windblades used on racing yachts instead of sails, as they are able to increase speed/knots with less wind used.

Oracle Racing are using one of the biggest blades on their Trimaran in a race against their advesary from Switzerland. Apparantly it took two cranes 9 hours to install last time on their trimaran for testing, and still testing.

Private Reply to Raymond Tautuhi

Nov 14, 2009 11:10 pmre: re: re: More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins#

Ron Sam
Ray,

Got any pictures?

Ron

Private Reply to Ron Sam

Nov 15, 2009 1:05 pmre: re: re: re: More Efficient Fan Blades Mimic Humpback Fins#

Ken Hilving
Interesting "kayak", Ron.

The wind turbine might take these blades a step further by adopting a linear electric motor/generator approach instead of the rotary electric motor/generator design we commonly think of. Having done this, the next step would be to consider other propulsion designs in nature. The marlin is the fastest swimmer in the ocean, using a single blade design. Perhaps it holds an advantage even over the humpback fin?

The flap as an alternative to rotary motion might be beneficial in regard to wind turbines posing a threat to birds, and might also offer aesthetic alternatives to those who don't like fields of fans.

Private Reply to Ken Hilving

Previous Topic | Next Topic | Topics

Back to Innovation Network





Ryze Admin - Support   |   About Ryze



Ryze Android preview app

Testing Gets Real: blog on A/B testing, building businesses with feedback loops, by Adrian Scott

© Ryze Limited. Ryze is a trademark of Ryze Limited.  Terms of Service, including the Privacy Policy