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Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part IIViews: 403
May 12, 2016 10:22 amSeth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

The toddler strategy 

 

Most people don't get too upset at anything a two-year-old kid says to them.

That's because we don't believe that toddlers have a particularly good grasp on the nuances of the world, nor do they possess much in the way of empathy. Mostly, though, it turns out that getting mad at a toddler doesn't do any good, because he's not going to change as a result (not for a few years, anyway).

Couldn't the same be said for your uninformed critics? For the people who bring you down without knowing any better, for those that sabotage your best work, or undermine your confidence for selfish reasons?

It's hardly productive to ruin your day and your work trying to teach these folks a lesson.

Better, I think, to treat them like a toddler. Buy them a lollipop, smile and walk away.



Brief intro about my biz http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0qEEzHmacs
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com Let's connect here at GBG online
SOUTH FLORIDA and Your city too
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters OR GBG


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

May 13, 2016 10:16 amre: Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

 

The momentum myth 

 

Roller coasters work because of momentum—the quantity of motion from the downhill allows the car to make it up the next rise. Without momentum, the car would merely stop. But few things in the world of ideas follow the same rules. 

Ideas have no mass, they don't coast.

Authors fall into this trap over and over again. They believe that a big launch, the huge push upfront, the bending of the media in their favor (at any cost) is the way to ensure that weeks two and three and eleven will continue to show solid growth.

A decade ago, I wrote two different posts for friends who were launching books. The ideas still stand.

I'm betting that an analysis of the Billboard charts over the last fifty years would confirm that the speed a song makes it to the top has no correlation with how long it stays at the top.

Here's a look at the cumulative sales for Your Turn, the book I published in November 2014. And you'd find a similar curve for most successful books.

The launch is the launch. What happens after the launch, though, isn't the result of momentum. It's the result of a different kind of showing up, of word of mouth, of the book (or whatever tool you're using to cause change) being part of something else, something bigger.

Fast starts are never as important as a cultural hook, consistently showing up and committing to a process. 


Brief intro about my biz http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0qEEzHmacs
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com Let's connect here at GBG online
SOUTH FLORIDA and Your city too
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters OR GBG


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

May 19, 2016 11:06 amre: re: Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

Our bias for paid marketing

 

A few rhetorical questions:

Is a physical therapist with a professional logo better than one with a handmade sign?

Are you more likely to stay at a hotel that you've heard of as opposed to an unknown one, even if 'heard of' refers to the fact that they've run ads?

Do you believe that companies that rank higher in search results are better than the ones a few pages later? And if you don't, then what's the reason we so often stop clicking after one page?

There are more ways than ever to spread the word about your work, but we live in a culture where paid ads still have clout.

"As Seen on TV" was such a powerful phrase that companies brag about it, right on the box. And that connection between paying for attention and quality still remains.

Over time, we've been sufficiently seduced by marketers that spend on the surface stuff that cognitive dissonance has persuaded us that we must be making those choices for a reason.

Find the discipline to build your projects like you won't be able to run ads to make them succeed. A product that sells itself, that's remarkable, that spreads.

Then consider running ads as if you don't need them.



Brief intro about my biz http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0qEEzHmacs
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com Let's connect here at GBG online
SOUTH FLORIDA and Your city too
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters OR GBG


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

Jun 19, 2016 12:08 pmSeth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

The saying/doing gap

 

At first, it seems as though the things you declare, espouse and promise matter a lot. And they do. For a while.

But in the end, we will judge you on what you do. When the gap between what you say and what you do gets big enough, people stop listening.

The compromises we make, the clients we take on, the things we do when we think no one is watching... this is how people measure us.

It seems as though the amount of time it takes for the gap to catch up with marketers/leaders/humans is getting shorter and shorter.



Brief intro about my biz http://www.dontWasteAnotherSecond.com
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com <--Let's connect here
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters http://www.WellSpokenBocan.com


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

Jun 20, 2016 11:45 amre: Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

 

You can't ask customers want they want

 

... not if your goal is to find a breakthrough. Because your customers have trouble imagining a breakthrough.

You ought to know what their problems are, what they believe, what stories they tell themselves. But it rarely pays to ask your customers to do your design work for you.

So, if you can't ask, you can assert. You can look for clues, you can treat different people differently, and you can make a leap. You can say, "assuming you're the kind of person I made this for, here's what I made."

The risk here is that many times, you'll be wrong.

But if you're not okay with that, you're never going to create a breakthrough. 


Brief intro about my biz http://www.dontWasteAnotherSecond.com
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com <--Let's connect here
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters http://www.WellSpokenBocan.com


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

Jun 28, 2016 10:29 amre: Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

 

The benefit of the doubt 

 

Doubt is corrosive.

Someone faced with doubt rarely brings her best self to the table. Doubt undermines confidence, it casts aspersions, it assumes untruths.

Yes, of course you need to qualify your leads. And yes, we know that you need to protect against risk and to not waste your time.

But... if you're going to spend five minutes or five hours with someone, what happens if you begin with, "the benefit of confidence" instead? What if you begin by believing, by seeking to understand, by rooting for the other person to share their best stories, their vision and their hopes?

Perhaps you can manipulate someone by scowling, by negging, by putting on airs. But if you do that, you end up with people who have been manipulated, who are wounded and not ready to soar.

The problem with qualifying leads is that all the obvious ones are already taken.

The challenge with assuming that someone is completely imperfect is that you'll almost certainly be right. 

There's plenty of room for doubt later, isn't there? 


Brief intro about my biz http://www.dontWasteAnotherSecond.com
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com <--Let's connect here
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters http://www.WellSpokenBocan.com


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

Jul 04, 2016 1:26 pmre: Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

 

Consider reconsidering 

 

Is there any other form of freedom that comes at such a low cost?

The freedom to change a habit, to change your mind, to change your expectations.

It takes guts and humility to change your mind. Fortunately, you have the freedom and the courage to do so. 


Brief intro about my biz http://www.dontWasteAnotherSecond.com
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com <--Let's connect here
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters http://www.WellSpokenBocan.com


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

Jul 05, 2016 10:56 amre: Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

 

The signals we send 

 

Some people go through their day unaware that every action they pursue has more than its obvious intent.

A glance is worth a thousand words. Asking for the check can be like a standing ovation--or a put down. A handshake is always more than just that.

You think you're merely putting on a blouse or typing an email or making small talk, but of course, you're also sending signals.

What we choose to do (and what we choose not to do) turns into a signal to the people around us.

These signals aren't universal, they are interpreted in different ways by people with different worldviews.

Some people are aware that they are sending signals, but can't quite figure out how to send the ones they mean to send. 

And a few people send the signals on purpose.

Empathy helps us understand what will be received, and intent dramatically improves our effectiveness. 


Brief intro about my biz http://www.dontWasteAnotherSecond.com
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com <--Let's connect here
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters http://www.WellSpokenBocan.com


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

Aug 28, 2016 6:12 pmre: re: Seth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

Speed is relative 

 

If you moved to Norway or Haiti or Bolivia, you'd notice something immediately: People don't move at the same speed you do.

The same thing is true about different organizations and different pockets of the internet. Or months of the year, for that matter.

There's not an absolute speed, a correct velocity, a posted limit or minimum for all of us. It's relative.

Given that, how does your speed match your goals and your strategy? Not compared to everyone else, but compared to the one and only thing you have control over?

Passing the slow cars on the road is an illusion, a chance to fool yourself into thinking you're making good progress. To a sloth, even a loris is a speedster.

 

 



Brief intro about my biz http://www.dontWasteAnotherSecond.com
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com <--Let's connect here
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters http://www.WellSpokenBocan.com


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

Sep 07, 2016 10:45 amSeth Godin Collection - Continued - Part II#

Paul Finkelstein

A hierarchy of value when everything functions 

 

Hierarchy of valueWhen two things offer simply the same appropriate level of function, we'll choose the cheap one.

But if one offers more connection than the other, it is worth more. This hotel over that one. Where is the tribe, do people like me do things like this, who's there, will they miss me, do I trust them, have I been here before...

If two items offer connection, but one offers the approval and sexiness that style brings, some of us will pay extra for that. After all, style promises ever more connection.

And at the top of the hierarchy is our quest for scarcity, desire and the hotness of now. 

In a market like smartphones, it's pretty clear that it's really difficult to offer more function than the other guy. And the quality of connection, the very attribute that fuels the smartphone, was surrendered to the app makers a long time ago. Which leaves the sexiness of a drop-dead case and the urgency of the latest model.

What do you and your team offer? Where are you in the hierarchy?

Most freelancers have been so beaten down in the quest to make a go of it, they stop at function and take what they can get. Some businesses (small and large) find the patience and guts to offer connection or even style. And every once in awhile, an idea and an organization come along that promise to share the elusive hot that sits atop the pyramid.

So, buy a Harley, not because it can move you from here to there cheaper, but because it comes with a tribe. And buy that Nars lipstick because of the way it makes you feel. And get on line for that new gadget, because, hey, there's a line.

And then, someone finds the audacity to redefine 'function' and the whole thing begins again.



Brief intro about my biz http://www.dontWasteAnotherSecond.com
http://www.GrandBusinessGroup.com <--Let's connect here
Contact me 866-443-0873 about Toastmasters http://www.WellSpokenBocan.com


Private Reply to Paul Finkelstein

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